Disabled man recorded fastest marathon!!

Disabled man recorded fastest marathon!!

In 2018 Virgin Money London Marathon on 22 April, there was one participant who was unique. He wasn’t running the marathon, he was walking. He was doing the 26.2-mile distance in an exoskeleton suit, just months after taking his first steps in four years. 36 hours and 46 minutes after setting off, Simon Kindleysides, 34, from Norwich (UK), set a new record for the fastest marathon distance in a robotic walking device. Simon was a dancer and a restaurant manager. But all that changed in 2013 when a brain tumour and functional neurological disorder left him paralysed from the waist down. Since then the dad of three had started using an exoskeleton suit, before finding one in 2017 called ReWalk that allowed him to climb stairs and go outside. Seven months later he was at the London Marathon, wearing a £100,000 exoskeleton suit which ReWalk had loaned him for his epic journey. Before starting his walk, Simon was due on a national news channel to talk about his marathon and raise the six-figure sum required to purchase his own suit. A rich man saw his story rang up ReWalk, handed over money and bought him one. Simon started his 60,373-step journey on Sunday 22 April 2018. Using a watch connected to his suit, the suit was able to replicate how a person walks, but in slow motion. When Simon leaned to the left, the plates in the right foot of his suit were activated to lift his right leg and move it forward, and so vice versa. The batteries in his suit allowed him to travel four miles at a time before they needed recharging. It was a grueling journey, and one which took more than 36 hours. A team of spotters, a physio and a mechanic helped him march onwards. At 10:46 p.m. on Monday 23 April, he crossed the finish line on Pall Mall, cheered on by well-wishers and police officers who applauded him during those last few steps. Members of the public also supported his effort, walking parts of the route with him, donating money and offering their homes for comfort breaks. The Brain Tumour Charity, which he raised £23,000 for, made him gold medal while two other runners who also raised money for the same organization, donated their London Marathon medals.

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