Oldest ancient device discovered by Scientists!

Oldest ancient device discovered by Scientists!

An ancient device, the world’s oldest astrolabe used for navigating at sea has been discovered by the scientists which was part of Portuguese explorers Vasco da Gama’s second voyage to India in the fourteenth century. Armada Ship has been certified by The Guinness World Records as the oldest in the world. Between 1496 and 1501 the Sodre astrolabe is believed to have been made and is unique in comparison to all other mariner’s astrolabes. Most notably the Portuguese and Spanish Mariner’s, Astrolabes were used for navigating at sea by early explorers. According to the researchers from the University of Warwick in the UK, they are considered to be the rarest and most prized of artefacts to be found on ancient shipwrecks and only 104 examples are known to exist in the world. In 1481, they were first used at sea on a Portuguese voyage down the west coast of Africa. During the most important explorations of the late 15th century, astrolabes were relied on for navigation, including those led by Bartolomeu Dias, Christopher Columbus and Vasco da Gama. It is the only solid disk type astrolabe with a verifiable provenance and the only specimen decorated with a national symbol: the royal coat of arms of Portugal. In the development of these iconic instruments verifiable mariner’s astrolabe fills a chronological gap and is believed to be a transitional instrument between the classic planispheric astrolabe and the open-wheel type astrolabe which was used before 1517. By a team who travelled to Muscat analyzed the thin 175 millimetres diameter disk weighing 344 grammes, Oman in November 2016 to collect laser scans of a selection of the most important artefacts recovered from the wreck site. They are capable of collecting over 50,000 points per second at an accuracy of 60 microns using a protable 7-axis Nikon laser scanner, a 3D virtual model of the artefact was created. A series of 18 scale marks spaced at uniform intervals along the limb of the disk were revealed by the analysis of the results. Further analysis showed that the spacing of the scale marks was equivalent to 5-degree intervals. This was critical evidence that allowed independent experts at Texas A&M University to include the disk in their global inventory as the earliest known mariner’s astrolabe discovered to date. This 3D scanning technology has enabled them to confirm the identity of the earliest known astrolabe, from this historians and scientists can determine more about history and how ships navigated.

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